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Stueve Stories (Our Egg Blog)

Latest UDSA Egg Production – where’s biodynamic?

plenty of production but the only biodynamic eggs come from Stueve Organic

May Egg Production Up 5 Percent

United States egg production totaled 8.52 billion during May 2016, up 5 percent from last year. Production included 7.36 billion table eggs, and 1.16 billion hatching eggs, of which 1.06 billion were broiler-type and 100 million were egg type. The total number of layers during May 2016 averaged 361 million, up 4 percent from last year. May egg production per 100 layers was 2,362 eggs, up 1 percent from May 2015.

All layers in the United States on June 1, 2016 totaled 360 million, up 8 percent from last year. The 360 million layers consisted of 302 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 54.6 million layers producing broiler-type hatching eggs, and 3.85 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on June 1, 2016, averaged 76.2 eggs per 100 layers, up 1 percent from June 1, 2015.

read more – http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/ChicEggs/ChicEggs-06-21-2016.pdf

What’s an Egg Lover to Do?

If you are hankering for a hen egg, the hierarchy goes like this:

  • GOLD STANDARD #A: Eggs from chickens in your own backyard feeding on your organic compost, worms, bugs, and grass while getting plenty of sunlight and clean air.
  • GOLD STANDARD #B: Biodynamic eggs from a farmer you TRUST.
  • SILVER: Pastured eggs from a farmer you TRUST! Assure the birds are pastured/bug/ worm/dirt/grass pecking and get lots of fresh air and sunlight.

read more – http://bodyecology.com/articles/whats-really-in-your-eggs.php

If you can’t raise eggs in your own backyard – buy Stueve Organic – the nation’s only biodynamic certified egg.

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Consumers’ View of Healthy Breakfasts

There is no standard definition for a healthy breakfast, as the words conjure up different things for different people. American consumers define healthy foods, using a wide variety of personal parameters, showing that healthy is relative. For some, the food must be high in fiber, meatless, organic or gluten-free. Others use food as a pharmacy, seeking items rich in protein, iron or calcium. Locavores view foods grown nearby as being healthier. Still others demand only non-GMO, antibiotic-free or sustainably-raised foods on their plates.

Kelly Weikel, Technomic’s director of consumer insights, says consumers are increasingly “choosing their own balanced, personal approach to health and wellness that makes them feel good emotionally and physically.” High-quality protein of the type found in eggs is critical for boosting brain function and supporting muscular health, enabling a successful do-it-yourself regimen. read more from the American Egg Board – http://bit.ly/1rEKmMK

March Egg Production Down 2 Percent

United States egg production totaled 8.50 billion during March 2016, down 2 percent from last year. Production included 7.36 billion table eggs, and 1.14 billion hatching eggs, of which 1.05 billion were broiler-type and 91 million were eggtype. The total number of layers during March 2016 averaged 361 million, down 1 percent from last year. March egg production per 100 layers was 2,353 eggs, down slightly from March 2015.

All layers in the United States on April 1, 2016 totaled 361 million, down 1 percent from last year. The 361 million layers consisted of 303 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 54.9 million layers producing broiler-type hatching eggs, and 3.74 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on April 1, 2016, averaged 75.5 eggs per 100 layers, down 2 percent from April 1, 2015. read more – USDA report

Pasture-Raised Poultry is Best

Posted 6/20/2015 by Mike Badger

There’s a new website called Buyingpoultry.com (a Farm Forward initiative) that is promoting a poultry labeling graphic that lists three categories of poultry classifications for consumers: avoid, better, and best. In the avoid category, Buying Poultry places “pasture-raised.” This graphic was subsequently posted by Slow Food USA on their blog.

APPPA took issue with the classification of pasture-raised while plant-based alternatives (e.g., laboratory produced chicken substitutes) were listed in the best category along with several closely related animal welfare certifications.

APPPA sent the following letter to Slow Food USA, Farm Forward, and Buying Poultry. read more – http://www.apppa.org/blog